“Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood.”
Marie Curie

 

byronegg:

Delaware Today

This is a piece for Delaware Today about young girls losing interest in science,technology, engineering and math related studies. The state’s schools and businesses are hoping to turn all this around. I love it when I come up with a few sketches that I still want to use for something and this was one of those times. A big thanks to AD Kelly Carter!

laboratoryequipment:

Researchers Watch Nanoparticles Form Structures in Real-TimeIn a new study performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have — for the first time — seen the self-assembly of nanoparticle chains in situ as it occurs in real-time.

The scientists exposed a tiny liquid “cell” or pouch that contained gold nanoparticles covered with a positively charged coating to an intense beam of electrons generated with a transmission electron microscope. Some of the electrons that penetrated the outside of the cell became trapped in the fluid medium in the cell. These “hydrated” electrons attracted the positively charged nanoparticles, which in time reduced the intensity of charge of the positive coating.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2013/04/researchers-watch-nanoparticles-form-structures-real-time

(Image: Tom Whyntie/CMS/CERN )

Love may be all about chemistry, but that hasn’t stopped particle  physicists from making their own special Valentines. This heart has been  pierced not by Cupid’s arrow, but two proton beams smashing together  within the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider.
Imperial College London researcher Tom Whyntie took data from one of the earliest collisions at the LHC and added simulated data that followed the path of a heart-shaped equation. He gave the picture to his girlfriend as a Valentine’s day card in 2010 - they are now happily married.
Whyntie isn’t the only one to mix particles with passion - Suzie Sheehy, a researcher at the  Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK wrote a Valentine’s day poem inspired by a heart-shaped simulation of 629 protons torn apart by a particle accelerator.

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2012/02/proton-beam-shot-through-the-h.html

(Image: Tom Whyntie/CMS/CERN )

Love may be all about chemistry, but that hasn’t stopped particle physicists from making their own special Valentines. This heart has been pierced not by Cupid’s arrow, but two proton beams smashing together within the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider.

Imperial College London researcher Tom Whyntie took data from one of the earliest collisions at the LHC and added simulated data that followed the path of a heart-shaped equation. He gave the picture to his girlfriend as a Valentine’s day card in 2010 - they are now happily married.

Whyntie isn’t the only one to mix particles with passion - Suzie Sheehy, a researcher at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK wrote a Valentine’s day poem inspired by a heart-shaped simulation of 629 protons torn apart by a particle accelerator.

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2012/02/proton-beam-shot-through-the-h.html